Sound Portrait l Part 3 – Reflection

For my upcoming JRNL102 Assessment I have decided to continue using the cinema theme. Working at a cinema myself, there are many sounds and experiences that I have become accustomed. Through my sound portrait I hope to be able to evoke that feeling you get when walking into the cinema. I want my audience to feel like they can smell the popcorn and taste their coke when they listen, reminding them how great going to the cinema can be.

I’ve chosen the cinema I work at, ‘The Roxy Cinema Complex’, not only because I have a connection with it myself but the building is very old, just celebrating it’s 80th birthday. My colleague Mason is one of the longest working employee’s and therefore I have chosen him to interview for the portrait. After working at the cinema for more than 5 years he has a very strong connection with the cinema and I feel that after working at the cinema for so long, his story of the cinema experience will help the audience feel a sense of connection.

To do this I am going to use mostly ambient sounds like popcorn, pouring drinks and people talking in the foyer to create the real feeling of being at the movies. This cut with my interview with Mason hopefully will create and uplifting feeling with the audience.

My purpose isn’t necessarily to tell a new story, but tell a simple everyday story that is relatable and made special.

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Cinema Nightlife: Sound Portrait l Part 2

 

The smell of buttery popcorn, the icy taste of a large coke and a creamy choc top from the freezer.

 

A cinema is a wonderful place for the senses. There are so many sights and smells at the movies, and each of these is usually associated with a range of distinctive sounds. This week I continued to develop my sound portrait from the week before, using a collection of sounds which I recorded while at my local cinema – ‘The Roxy Cinema Complex’ – in Nowra.

 

Going to the movies is a very visual experience and over the last couple of weeks I have enjoyed exploring the best way to transfer this experience into audio.

 

I began my sound portrait outside the cinema, recording the sounds of getting out of your car and the traffic as you cross the street. 11844056_10207464710965771_1758630664_nInside I then recorded some distinctive sounds like pouring a drink, the popcorn machine and the conversations at the counter. These sounds help to locate my portrait’s setting and create an affiliation with place.

 

The next step for my sound portrait is to incorporate more audio in a way so that I can show a connection between the cinema and a person – maybe a staff member or a regular customer. I feel like now the challange will be integrating a person and their connection to the cinema in while cutting the audio down to meet the time limit.

lHannah Laxton

JRNL101: A Shade of Red – Renee Middlemost

“It’s either a love or a hate. There’s nothing in the middle. People come up to you, and either say, ‘I love your hair so much’, or else you’ll be walking down the street, and people will be yelling out crazy abuse at you.”

After dyeing her hair a different colour, every six months, for most of her life, 34 year-old, Renee Middlemost, loves her current shade of red. “Red has been the longest-term commitment I’ve had,” she joked. “Nearly two years. I know – it’s a long relationship.

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“I don’t understand why other people aren’t as respectful,” 34 year-old Renee Middlemost explained.

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JRNL101: SBS Saga Splits Opinions

On the 26th of April 2015, SBS sports journalist, Scott McIntyre was dismissed from the broadcasting service, after posting a series of tweets on ANZAC Day.

During the course of ANZAC Day, McIntyre tweeted five times, to over 30,000 followers, criticizing Australia’s participation in a several wars.

SBS Managing Director, Michael Ebeid, and Director of Sport, Ken Shipp, stated that McIntyre had breached the station’s Code of Conduct and social media policy, Ebeid describing the tweets as “inappropriate and disrespectful”.

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JRNL101: The Great Gonzo Debate

Gonzo is a style of reporting, which has regularly divided journalists in many areas of the field.

Hunter S. Thomspon, father of Gonzo journalism - Source: Daily Post

Hunter S. Thomspon, father of Gonzo journalism – Source: Daily Post

The genre of reporting, known as Gonzo, spawned from American author and writer Hunter S. Thompson, and was first illustrated in his detailed first person narrative, The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved.

The style contrasts traditional methods of reporting, with Gonzo journalists renouncing their claims of objectivity. This is a practice, regarded by Guardian reporter Bradley L. Garrett, as essential.

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